Field Notes Volume 3 | Number 9 July 2th, 2015

Sharing the Harvest

Sometimes the farm is overwhelmed with beauty and abundance- the leaves of fresh greens shimmer in the morning sun, the crops stand in neat rows and disappear off into the distance, the bluebirds swoop through the air and alight upon a tomato stake. Sometimes things are not so pretty- the weeds- left uncultivated for want of dry ground rise up between the rows, a beds of beans which were the day before reaching up to the heavens are chopped
down by deer.
This season has had a lot of both. We have had high days and low days. Wet spells and dry spells, and wet spells, and even more wet spells. ItÂ’s hard to remember if this year was as wet as the last, but it can be hard to think otherwise when the rain comes and doesnÂ’t relent. This year has been especially hard for most farmers in the area, at the markets I see much less than even in previous years, but we at Harmony Farm and in the CSA have been blessed with a great start to our season. Carrots, beets,

Laying Hens enjoying the good Life. eggs coming soon!

Laying Hens enjoying the good Life. eggs coming soon!

sugar snap peas, spinach, zucchini, and cucumbers have flowed in greater number than years past. Others stand prolifically in the field waiting for their call to the stage- sweet corn, watermelon, and cantaloupe and a grand abundance and variety of tomatoes. Honestly I have been very happy with the shares this year. We were blessed mostly by good fortune and timing in the early season which allowed us to get many crops in the ground when other farmers were not so fortunate.
Recently though things have become a challenge- the rain comes and doesnÂ’t let up, workers leave, deer come, and a million and one things hit us at once and all we can do is hustle and carry on to try to stay ahead. These kinds of season seem to be becoming more and more common with the onset of climate change and are another grand problem to solve in the life of a farm
and a farmer.
Harmony Farm has implemented some of these strategies, which can help to mitigate the effects of highly variable weather events, but farming is a growing and learning experience even for the most seasoned among us.

new fence overlooking the garden

new fence overlooking the garden

What this weather has meant for the farm is that some of our scheduled plantings could not make it into the ground, while others have suffered in the wet conditions and have met an untimely demise. We do our best to counter these impacts, by planting a greater variety of crops, but mother nature and father time will not be denied their due. Some items that we hoped would be continuously available will not be for the near future- cabbage, salad mix, spinach, scallions, while others may be in short supply- zucchini and cukes (although I imagine some of you have had enough of both for a while). With this break in the weather we are blessed once again with the chance to plant and prepare for the time ahead and fall looks promising for bountiful harvests.
That is what a CSA is about- it is a mutual relationship established upon trust and the assumption of a shared risk that helps farmers farm and eaters eat. When there is more abundance we try to share as much as we can, and when times are lean we hope you will understand that we do our best to make sure you have enough. We hope that you have been and will continue to be happy with the CSA and that you look forward as much as we do to the harvests
ahead. -Farmer Sky

CSA pick-list
Cherry Tomatoes- Enjoy! Please do not refrigerate!
Beefsteak Tomatoes- Enjoy, Please do not refrigerate!
Zucchini- Just a bit.
Cucumbers- Just a bit.
Kale- Try a kale salad!
Basil or Parsley- Try pesto! Store in a cool place in your kitchen in water (like a flower)
Beets- I love them roasted whole and sliced into a simple salad with goat cheese.

Pretty Zinnia.

Pretty Zinnia.

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